Android App Publishers Won’t Take ‘No’ for an Answer on Personal Data

For the small percentage of users that actually take notice of privacy notices, sometimes it doesn’t matter what they click…:

[…] At the Federal Trade Commission’s PrivacyCon 2019, held in June, researchers from the International Computer Science Institute (ICSI) presented data showing that as many as 1,325 Android apps were gathering data from devices, even after the device owners had denied such permission to the apps.

The data presented at the conference is based on earlier work the researchers presented at the Usenix Security Symposium in February. In that paper, titled “50 Ways to Leak Your Data,” the team of researchers from UC Berkeley, AppCensus, and Universidad Carlos III de Madrid examined more than 88,000 Android apps to see how they captured, used, and stored customer data. They found that Android apps employ a number of techniques for gathering data that the user may believe is private.

As an example, the researchers pointed to photography apps that scrape the GPS data from photographs to obtain location information after the user has denied the app the right to gather location data. Other apps inferred location information by gathering the MAC address of Wi-Fi routers the device was connected to rather than directly polling for location information.

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Original article here