[Video] Life With GDPR: Episode 32- Lessons Learned in Year 1 of GDPR, Part 2

This is a useful summary for we Europeans as well. In my role as a DPO I tend to use the DPIA as my starting point for each engagement. DSARs are a more difficult discussion because it’s not until your business sees a ramp-up in requests do you tend to put systems in place to deal with them…:

In this podcast, data privacy/data security expert Jonathan Armstrong and Compliance Evangelist Tom Fox use the framework of GDPR to discuss a wide range of issues relating to these topics. They consider what the US compliance and InfoSec security expert needs to know about what is happening in the UK, Europe and beyond. In this episode, we continue our three-part series of some of the key lessons learned from the first year of GDPR. Some of the issues and highlights are:

DPIA Everything. It’s mandatory under GDPR. It is a process analysis so you will need Subject Matter Expertise. How often do you revisit DPIA? Regulators are beginning to look at the process of your DPIA. When new process comes into play, you should do a new DPIA. Do you require DPIA when you hire 3rdparty vendor or in the M&A situation? If not you should do so moving forward.

Do SARs and DSRs are real good. How do you deal with these types of request? More importantly do you have a centralized team to understand the reason behind the request. Who could make that analysis? Is it a work in progress for your organization? Robust response to SARs is critical, as they are here to stay as core component of GDPR.

Respect the time. Time limits are much more generous in the US. Some regulators suggest not to be obsessed with time. Will courts allow ‘reasonable delay’? Corporations trying to extend the 72 hour by time zone arguments and other ridiculous argument by US corporations. (Listen for the Thanksgiving Weekend exemption) Regulators can fine you for being late. Are US companies getting the message? It’s a mixed bag, some are not doing so.

 

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